got water?

DROUGHT!

Much has been written and said about the historic drought our region is dealing with. The Governor has asked all of us to reduce our water use by at least 20% and, as most of our residential water use occurs in our gardens (50%-70% on average), this is the first place we should be looking to conserve.

We’ve collectively been meeting our conservation targets and mandatory restrictions have been lifted state wide. But we’re not out of the drought yet.

We can help you and your garden through these tough times. Our clients should already be well prepared – we’ve been installing gardens that harvest rainwater, efficient irrigation systems, and California native and climate appropriate plants for many years now. We are also happy to come by for a tune-up and to make sure that everything is growing as planned.

For new, existing and former clients we are available for consultations. We can help you work with the current rebates for lawn replacement, irrigation upgrades and rain garden/rainwater harvesting. And, of course, we are available to redesign your current landscape to both look and function beautifully in our changing climate.

DIY? Take a look at one of the handbooks below. (We helped G3 write all three!) They are full of gardening information, plant lists, plant designs and helpful tips to help any landscape thrive with as little water as possible:

Drought Tolerant Garden, Los Angeles County Handbook

San Diego Sustainable Landscape Guidelines

City of Beverly Hills Garden Handbook

Finally, some words on water for you to ponder…

Some of us who live in the arid parts of the world think about water with a reverence others might find excessive.  The water I will draw tomorrow from my tap in Malibu is today crossing the Mojave Desert from the Colorado River, and I like to think about exactly where that water is. The water I will drink tonight in a restaurant in Hollywood is by now well down the Los Angeles Aqueduct from the Owens River, and I also think about where that water is:  I particularly like to imagine it as it cascades down the 45-degree stone steps that aerate Owens water after its airless passage through the mountain pipes and siphons.

-Joan Didion, “Holy Water” from The White Album, 1977

This is still true today.  This water comes to Los Angeles at great cost.  We believe gardens are more beautiful, more bountiful, and more alive without this burden, and we are working to change the paradigm.

 

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